“The Sky is Yours” by Chandler Klang Smith (Ft. Dragons, Snotty Characters, And My Overwhelming Disappointment)

Basically: This book was creative, but it unfortunately wasn’t for me. I actually applaud myself for making it through.


🐉 What’s the story about? 🐉

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A sprawling, genre-defying epic set in a dystopian metropolis plagued by dragons, this debut about what it’s like to be young in a very old world is pure storytelling pleasure

In the burned-out, futuristic city of Empire Island, three young people navigate a crumbling metropolis constantly under threat from a pair of dragons that circle the skies. When violence strikes, reality star Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, the spoiled scion of the metropolis’ last dynasty; Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg, his tempestuous, death-obsessed betrothed; and Abby, a feral beauty he discovered tossed out with the trash; are forced to flee everything they’ve ever known. As they wander toward the scalded heart of the city, they face fire, conspiracy, mayhem, unholy drugs, dragon-worshippers, and the monsters lurking inside themselves. In this bombshell of a novel, Chandler Klang Smith has imagined an unimaginable world: scathingly clever and gorgeously strange, The Sky Is Yours is at once faraway and disturbingly familiar, its singular chaos grounded in the universal realities of love, family, and the deeply human desire to survive at all costs.

The Sky Is Yours is incredibly cinematic, bawdy, rollicking, hilarious, and utterly unforgettable, a debut that readers who loved Cloud Atlas, Super Sad True Love Story, and Blade Runner will adore.

“Beneath our city lies another city, carved into the earth, a city of hollowness, a city of emptiness, a city of negative space. Its skyline will never be revealed, not until that time in the future when our society’s final resting place is excavated and disturbed by a more advanced species.”

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Before and After: Book Blog Edition | In Which I Take You Through My Blog’s Embarrassingly Awkward Evolution

My blog is honestly such an adventure because every single time you visit my site something changes! A well-developed, consistent theme? WHAT IS THAT LOL.

If you can’t already tell from my a) incoherent paragraphs, b) grammatical errors, and c) refusal to edit said grammatical errors, it’s currently 2:30 AM and I… don’t know what I’m typing. I feel drunk except all I’ve had today is three pouches of CapriSun and I’m most likely just excessively sleep-deprived. I should really stop

fun fact this is the gif I use most often and I don’t know what that says about me

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My Top 5 Fave YA Side Characters Who Are #TPFTW (aka Too Precious For This World)

I have an enormous soft spot for side characters. They’re often so underrated but I LOVE THEM.

Obviously a book revolves around its protagonists, but side characters offer new perspectives and are key to propelling the story forward. Plus they’re fabulous for the entertainment value! I mean, some side characters have such a larger-than-life personality that the author feels compelled to continue their journey in a spin-off series (I’m looking @ you King of Scars ;)).

So to celebrate the value of supporting characters, I’m going to highlight some of my absolute favorites! These will all be in bullet points because why not  and also I’m too lazy to write complete, coherent sentences.

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“Heart of Thorns” by Bree Barton | Witchcraft + Women!

Rating: 1/2

We are magicians because of our suffering. A woman’s body can survive only so much abuse before our very blood and bones rise up in revolt.

Witches who can snuff out life with the slightest whisper of a touch. Ancient, glorious, forbidden magic. Cruel kings and a vicious palace filled with pawns. What more could I ask for in a book? 

(Turns out, a lot of things.)

Alas, the promising synopsis—and, may I add, the absolutely breathtaking cover—failed to truly deliver. Heart of Thorns was disappointingly mediocre, and my overall experience with it can be summed up with a simple yet quite pertinent phrase: been there, read that.

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